web page image spacer
web page image spacer classic car resources autoclassic.com :: logo type autoclassic.com :: logo icon web page image spacer
rule
classic car resources
web page image spacer
web page image spacer web page image spacer web page image spacer web page image spacer web page image spacer web page image spacer web page image spacer web page image spacer web page image spacer web page image spacer
web page image spacer featuresfeatures web page image spacer  searchfeatures web page image spacer  contributefeatures web page image spacer  advertisefeatures web page image spacer web page image spacer
web page image spacer
build and manage your own web site with WordServer, easy to use web site design and content managment system
wordserver web site design and content management system
MYSAFEUK Stylish and Discreet Credit and Debit Card Holder
MYSAFEUK Credit Card Holder
web page image spacer
web page image spacer
The History of Classic Cars: 1919 Morris Cowley ‘Bullnose’rule
web page image spacer
web page image spacer
rule
web page image spacer
back to classic car Index | next classic car
web page image spacer
rule
web page image spacer
Photo unavailable

Sorry, we do not currently have a photograph for this car.

If you have a photo of this classic, that we could use
then please email us at:

info@autoclassic.com
web page image spacer
Morris Cowley ‘Bullnose’

Years in production: 1915–1926
web page image spacer
Structure: Front engine/rear-drive. Separate chassis
web page image spacer
Engine type: 4-cylinder, side-valve
web page image spacer
Bore and stroke: 69.5 x 102 mm
web page image spacer
Capacity: 1,548 cc
web page image spacer
Power: 26 bhp @ 2,800 rpm
web page image spacer
Fuel supply: One Smith carburettor
web page image spacer
Suspension: Beam-axle front, beam-axle rear
web page image spacer
Weight: 1,750 lb
web page image spacer
Top speed: 50 mph
web page image spacer
1919 Morris Cowley ‘Bullnose’

The original Morris, the much-loved ‘Bullnose’, was Britain’s equivalent – and in competition with – the Ford Model T, though its inventor, William Morris, had different ways of achieving the result. Whereas Ford had concluded that he must make as much of the car as possible in his own factories, Morris used proprietary or ‘bought-in’ components for some years at first.

Having started out in business by opening a cycle sales and repair shop in Oxford, Morris bought a disused building at Cowley, near Oxford (but one which adjoined open farm land), to produce cars in 1913. First with a car called the ‘Oxford’, then from 1915 with a smaller-engined version called ‘Cowley’, he built up a business which was Britain’s largest car producer by 1924, when it overtook Ford UK.

The Cowley’s design was as simple as that of the Model T. More conventional, it was distinguished by its rounded, bulbous, radiator style, which soon inspired the unofficial, but lasting nickname. At first almost every component was bought in, ready-manufactured, including engines from Coventry, transmissions from Birmingham, and bodies from a variety of sources. It was only as the 1920s progressed, and as the factory continued to grow, that Morris either bought up his suppliers, or started making components close to the assembly lines.

The RAC rated ‘Oxford’ types at 13.9 horsepower, and ‘Cowley’ types at 11.9 hp. They both used versions of Coventry-made engines, and many different body types were available (including super-sports versions which subsequently became the first MGs). By aggressively reducing prices at a time when costs were rising, Morris saw sales rocket.
web page image spacer

Having produced only 3,077 cars in 1921, Morris went on to build 54,151 in 1925, by which time the Bullnose was nearly ready for replacement. As with the Model T, this market domination was achieved by cutting prices, which eventually came down to a mere £162 by 1925. No other car or model could match that, for the engines had been specifically designed to take advantage of Britain’s tax laws. This, and the way that Bullnose types sold steadily throughout the countries of the Empire, ensured Morris’s supremacy.

In the next few years Morris, who eventually became Lord Nuffield, allowed his business to diversify, so that far too many models were being sold at a time when the market-place was contracting, the result being that Austin rapidly caught up, and that Morris was never again as dominant as it had been in the mid 1920s.

The Bullnose become a British best-seller, and Morris followed up this success by buying other marques and factories (such as Wolseley) to expand even further. His actions helped to kill off many other makes of British car which simply could not compete with Morris’s tactics.

web page image spacer
rule
web page image spacer
Our thanks to the publisher Bookmart, who kindly provided this history content for us
(c) text copyright Bookmart Ltd 2002
web page image spacer
rule
web page image spacer
web page image spacer web page image spacer web page image spacer web page image spacer
web page image spacer autoclassic.com :: classic car resources autoclassic.com :: logo iconweb page image spacer web page image spacer
rule
web page image spacer
web page image spacer
web page image spacer site designed and managed by astutech ltd with elements powered by wordserver 1.1 © copyright astutech ltd 2002  I  e-mail: info@autoclassic.com web page image spacer
web page image spacer